The Design of my Thoughts

designerscomplex:

To celebrate their 80th year, Danish company LEGO have created a short animated film which takes a look at their rich history, touching on everything from their iconic name came to the evolution of their colourful building pieces. Founded by Ole Kirk Christiansen and his son Godtfred back in 1932, the whimsical company have formed an intrinsic part of many peoples’ childhoods all over the world and will hopefully continue for many more years. Happy birthday LEGO! Watch the film above.

via http://www.huhmagazine.co.uk/4142/video-the-lego-story

artchipel:

Wj313 (China) - 【王国大逆袭】ST

[more Wj313 | artist found at artcollageleivos]

(Source: artchipel, via acousticlovesong)

This is an actual photograph of Saturn creating a total Solar Eclipse for the Cassini spacecraft. In the distance, the furthest image of earth ever taken, can be seen…In the shadow of Saturn, unexpected wonders appear. The robotic Cassini spacecraft now orbiting Saturn drifted in giant planet’s shadow for about 12 hours in 2006 and looked back toward the eclipsed Sun. Cassini saw a view unlike any other. First, the night side of Saturn is seen to be partly lit by light reflected from its own majestic ring system. Next, the rings themselves appear dark when silhouetted against Saturn, but quite bright when viewed away from Saturn, slightly scattering sunlight. Saturn’s rings light up so much that new rings were discovered, although they are hard to see in the image. Seen in spectacular detail, however, is Saturn’s E ring, the ring created by the newly discovered ice-fountains of the moon Enceladus and the outermost ring visible above. Far in the distance, at the left, just above the bright main rings, is the almost ignorable pale blue dot of Earth.

This is an actual photograph of Saturn creating a total Solar Eclipse for the Cassini spacecraft. In the distance, the furthest image of earth ever taken, can be seen…

In the shadow of Saturn, unexpected wonders appear.
The 
robotic Cassini spacecraft now orbiting Saturn drifted in giant planet’s shadow for about 12 hours in 2006 and looked back toward the eclipsed Sun. Cassini saw a view unlike any other. First, the night side of Saturn is seen to be partly lit by light reflected from its own majestic ring system. Next, the rings themselves appear dark when silhouetted against Saturn, but quite bright when viewed away from Saturn, slightly scattering sunlight. Saturn’s rings light up so much that new rings were discovered, although they are hard to see in the image. Seen in spectacular detail, however, is Saturn’s E ring, the ring created by the newly discovered ice-fountains of the moon Enceladus and the outermost ring visible above. Far in the distance, at the left, just above the bright main rings, is the almost ignorable pale blue dot of Earth.

classicpenguin:

Check out the fantastic Titanic art work by Max Ellis!

In today’s New York Times, John Williams calls Titanic: First Accounts “the loveliest of the bunch” of Titanic-related books published around the centennial of the disaster in April. The collection includes accounts and testimonies by survivors and eye-witnesses, including Lawrence Beesley, Margaret Brown, Archibald Gracie, and Carlos F. Hurd.

We asked our cover artist, Max Ellis—who was trained as a precision engineer—to describe some of the details he included in his masterful illustration. You can read all of Ellis’s explanations on his process, fascination, and research (and zoom in on the cover with a magnifer) here by clicking on “see the full cover up close.” Below are a few choice details matched to the above blow-ups.

The meat freezer

There was ample refrigerated storage on the orlop deck to supply the kitchens. 75,000 pounds of meat were taken on board for her maiden voyage.

The coal rooms

The engines, boilers and coal rooms were probably my favorite part of the ship while I was working on it. I work for a UK dive magazine and have illustrated over 130 wrecks and often the only recognizable part of the ship will be the engines and boilers, around which are usually strewn piles of coal. Its not until you see the size of the boilers, and realize that there are rows of five of them you really get a scale for the Titanic. The coal bunkers were immense, running the entire width of the ship and some 30 feet high. They had to be this large to feed the hungry furnaces consuming 825 tons of coal per day. It took 24 hours to store the 6300 tons of coal before her maiden voyage.

The swimming pool

Another of my favorite parts of the ship. I had to piece my image of the baths together from several old black-and-white stills I found online. It seems somehow exotic to have a swimming pool below decks on a boat. I wonder how much the water slopped about in rough seas!

The squash court

The first class squash racquet court was reserved for first class passengers who were charged 2 shillings for an hour’s play. There was very little information on the court, and I could find only a couple of dingy stills online. Luckily a helpful member of one of the several Titanic forums that helped me in my research for this image had found video of passengers playing in the court on Titanic’s sister ship the RMS Olympic. Even then no drawings or reference exists of the parts of the court not visible in the recording or where the light sources were so I had to guestimate those bits. The other fact that was left to speculation was the construction of the floor of the court. It is in the bow section of the ship and sloped upward over its 30 foot length (All of these large liners had sloping decks up from the center section to give the ship stability) I decided it should have a false floor to give the players a level playing field.

The kitchen

This was great fun to build. I loved seeing how the flues from the stoves joined the main vent. It was very hard to find the reference for this and took quite a while to get my head around how it all interlinked.

The steam pipes

Along with the engines, the huge steam and engine fume pipes were one of my favorite parts to research and build. I loved the fact that this huge beautiful vessel had these enormous spaces to allow it to breathe. The forward three funnels lead down to the boilers and vent the fumes through huge upside down pipes creating a tree of branching funnels. The fourth funnel actually carried no exhaust fumes and was included for aesthetic reasons, actually letting light down into the lower sections of the ship. It did, however, carry the waste gasses and smoke from the kitchens.

The garage

Obviously Titanic’s first class passengers had to bring their first class transport aboard ship, and Titanic was equipped with car storage space in the bow section. Cars where lowered down the number two hatch using the enormous electric cranes. It was a lot of fun going through the old photographs to find reference for the beautiful cars that went down with the ship. I wonder how intact they must be, protected as they are in the fairly intact bow section of the wreck.

(via lustik)

An incredible look at the animatronics of the T-Rex from Jurassic Park! a whole host of videos can be found here

An incredible video displaying the unfathomable size of the Universe, and Earth’s rather insignificant place within it. Anyone who says space isn’t both the most astonishing mental adventure and inhabited by other life forms, you need to watch this and then try to explain why you think those things. 

(Source: brobi-wan-kenobi)

lustik:

The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore via Publique

This is both beautiful and creative. I absolutely love it :)

Inspired, in equal measures, by Hurricane Katrina, Buster Keaton, The Wizard of Oz, and a love for books, “Morris Lessmore” is a story of people who devote their lives to books and books who return the favor. Morris Lessmore is a poignant, humorous allegory about the curative powers of story. Using a variety of techniques (miniatures, computer animation, 2D animation) award winning author/ illustrator William Joyce and Co-director Brandon Oldenburg present a new narrative experience that harkens back to silent films and M-G-M Technicolor musicals. “Morris Lessmore” is old fashioned and cutting edge at the same time. 

“The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore” is one of five animated short films that will be considered for outstanding film achievements of 2011 in the 84th Academy Awards.

When you start to see the Milky Way about half way through, that is the sort of sky I slept under a lot on my trip. Absolutely stunning!

(Source: inspirationfeed)

Great advert, I really really like the idea of little petrol driven things in life (not that it is promoting that!)